artscene.ro - contemporary art platform

Cezar Lazarescu


Cezar Lazarescu Cezar Lazarescu

Cezar Lazarescu Cezar Lazarescu

Cezar Lazarescu Cezar Lazarescu

Cezar Lazarescu Cezar Lazarescu

Cezar Lazarescu Cezar Lazarescu

Cezar Lazarescu Cezar Lazarescu

Cezar Lazarescu Cezar Lazarescu

Cezar Lazarescu Cezar Lazarescu

Cezar Lazarescu Cezar Lazarescu

Cezar Lazarescu Cezar Lazarescu

Cezar Lazarescu Cezar Lazarescu

Cezar Lazarescu Cezar Lazarescu

Cezar Lazarescu Cezar Lazarescu

Cezar Lazarescu Cezar Lazarescu

Cezar Lazarescu Cezar Lazarescu

Cezar Lăzărescu, born in 1969, works and lives in Iași, Romania. He studied at the Academy of Art în Iași. Lăzărescu describes his artistic practice as follows: "Using incredible easy means (sometimes exclusively conceptual) I try to overpass the intellectual prejudices and stereotypes, being aware of the place I hold in the world and as well as of the fact that I can use and I can be used." His work was exhibited, among others, at Royal College of Art Galleries Kensington Gore, London, Reiner Tisch Gallery, Berlin and Württembergischen Kunstverein Stuttgart, Stuttgart.


----------------------------------
Extremely active within the context of the Periferic biennials in Iasi, Cezar Lăzărescu made a series of performances between 1998 and 2002 that were trying to frame the local art context within an ironic discourse, based on minor gestures. At that time, one of his favorite targets was the public of the biennial, who was participating in Cezar’s manipulations without necessarily wanting to do so, just because they were there as guests, watching other artists presenting their work.

For instance, in 1998, during Periferic 2 biennial, Dan Perjovschi was doing a performance in front of about thirty people. Cezar was in the public and he was holding a bag in his hand. The text read ‘I like Periferic 3’, making a rather nasty remark about his interest in the biennial that was only going to take place in two year’s time.

In the year 2000, still inside the public, the artist was looking at the performances while holding in his hands a 40x50 cm mirror that was constantly pointed at the performers and at the audience as well. As a guest at the opening of another exhibition in the year 2001, Cezar wore a jacket on which black lettering was glued. On his back, the text read in capital letters ‘Aesthetically correct’, referring to the expectations of the visitors in relation to the given exhibition.

Starting with 2004, a preocupation for the political arises. For example, in ‘If the House of the People didn’t exist’, the building erected by Nicolae Ceausescu is erased entirely from the image using digital means, and then it is replaced with an extended area of blue sky. During that time, the other local obsession was Romania’s integration in the European Union. Knowing this, the artist prints black text on a series of white t-shits, in 2005, with the conjugation of the phrase ‘I am in Eu’. Inevitably, this leads to statements such as ‘It is in EU’, etc, reducing the pshichological tension produced by the accession to the level of a daily occurrence.
 
For the artist, the piece of text reduced to the minimum works as an axiom that reveals the surrounding things and gestures, arranging these according to his interpretations. ‘First politics and then art’ is a good example to this end. On one hand, the expression underlines the lack of interest of the local political context for the artistic gestures. At the same time, it debates from a critical point of view the automatic tendency of contemporary artists to consider the political realm as being a territory to explore, sometimes using verbal and ideological stereotypes, falling into the trap of a certain academic discourse present in the mainstream.

Objects can also be modified using the same type of small scale means, which are very efficient, by inducing radical changes of the meanings that we attach to things. In 2009, Cezar covers the dial of a white clock with a white film, so that all the visual markers of time are removed. Only the clock’s ticking is left to measure time, which has become invisible.

A conceptual artist and a performer, Cezar Lazarescu concentrates on the use of language, of minor gestures and objects, searching for the reversal of banal or automatic meanings or interpretations. What seems to interest him most is the transformation of the insignificant into something amazing, or into something that surprises us as a completely new reality, in the very area we are most used with stable meanings. In a very direct manner, his art is addressed to the logical part of our intellect, but also to our ability to enjoy irony and humor.

Text by Mircea Nicolae
-----------------------------------------

Contacts:
w: roclazarescu.blogspot.com
e: roclazarescu@yahoo.com
t: +40 (0)768 271 394 

on line projects:
The contemporary art magazine e-cart
e-cart.ro issue nr 8
e-cart.ro issue nr 7
e-cart.ro issue nr 4


Artreview
Events | Artists | Curators and critics | Artspaces | Biennials | Magazines | In the press | Contact | © 2009 - 2010 www.artscene.ro